Movie Of The Day: Nosferatu (1922)

Ironically, one of the the most infamous and well-regarded adaptations of Bram Stoker’s seminal novel Dracula, and one of the most influential vampire movies in the history of cinema, is not actually an official adaptation and would be lost today if it weren’t for some happy circumstances. It is the German color-tinted silent film Nosferatu: Eine Symphonie Des Grauens, literally Nosferatu: A Symphony Of Horror but also known in English as Nosferatu: A Symphony Of Terror, Nosferatu The Vampire and Terror Of Dracula.

Directed by the legendary F.W. Murnau (Sunrise: A Song Of Two Humans) and written by Henrik Galeen (The Golem), the film follows Dracula‘s story pretty well, mainly omitting some characters and changing names and locations. A real estate employee named Hutter is sent by his boss to meet with the reclusive Count Orlok and sell him a house. Strange events surround him as he arrives and he eventually realizes that Orlok is a vampire, and that his eyes are set on Hutter’s wife Ellen. Trailer and review after the jump. Continue reading

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Dracula to return, officially that is

Dracula is such an omnipresent figure of today’s culture it’s sometimes easy to forget that he isn’t a product of mythical lore but rather a relatively recent (1897) literary creation by author Bram Stoker (above), just like Sherlock Holmes, Harry Potter and no, not The Three Musketeers because those actually really existed.

Now Bram’s great gand-nephew Dacre Stoker has gathered discarded notes from his renowned ancestor’s archives and has set about writing an official sequel to the original book, set 25 years later and titled Dracula: The Un-Dead, with the help of genre specialist Ian Holt.

The book will only be released by this time next year but the movie rights have already been sold, and the adaptation will start shooting in June 2009! Dutch filmmaker Jan De Bont (Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle Of Life) will produce and probably direct. Now correct me if I’m wrong, but if we’re getting the sequel to a story, shouldn’t we get a new adaptation of the original first?

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Original director is pissed at vampire remake

Let The Right One In (original title Låt Den Rätte Komma In), a Swedish vampire film winner of every award it’s been nominated for (for now at least), is uselessly being remade in English by Cloverfield director Matt Reeves and original director Tomas Alfredson is understandably unhappy.

“Remakes should be made of movies that aren’t very good, that gives you the chance to fix whatever has gone wrong,” Alfredson tells Moviezine. “I’m very proud of my movie and think it’s great, but the Americans might be of an other opinion. The saddest thing for me would be to see that beautiful story made into something mainstream.” … “I don’t like to whine, but of course – if you’d spent years on painting a picture, you’d hate to hear buzz about a copy even before your vernissage!”

Hear hear Tomas Alfredson, I couldn’t agree more. See the original film’s trailer here.

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Another useless remake, and from a crappy director to boot!

Despite the fact that it hasn’t been shown anywhere except from film festivals, the Swedish vampire film Let The Right One In (original title Låt Den Rätte Komma In) is already getting a remake courtesy of director Matt Reeves aka the guy who brought us Cloverfield, one of the worst, most overrated movies of all time. Why, God, why? As usual, watch the original’s trailer above.

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