Star Wars: The Clone Wars continues tonight, watch the trailer

Following directly from this summer’s eponymous underrated film, actually the pilot for the TV series, Star Wars: The Clone Wars will debut tonight at 9 PM in the US on Cartoon Network (and in two days in Canada on CTV, and on the 25th in the UK on Sky Movies Premiere). It is set between Attack Of The Clones and Revenge Of The Sith, and more precisely between episodes 21 and 22 of the previous 2D Clone Wars series.

Judging from its movie pilot, Star Wars: The Clone Wars is actually a really high quality show if you don’t forget what it’s supposed to be, which is something aimed primarily towards kids. It should be compared to other spin-off cartoons such as the Godzilla and Mummy ones, which it easily surpasses, but it still focuses mostly on action and childish humor.

You musn’t forget that Lucasfilm wasn’t trying for a perfect likeness of live-action when making this and thus, that the look is very intentional, not a result of “making something on the cheap” as the quality of the animation is actually top-notch.

So once again, this is a worthwhile watch if you enjoy the Star Wars universe and understand what that this is a show for kids first and foremost. The first season will consist of 22 episodes, and more than a hundred are planned for the series’ full run. Official description follows after the jump. Continue reading

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New Trailer and Poster: Inkheart

It seems ages ago that Inkheart‘s first trailer premiered, and that’s because, well, it was. Indeed, the fantasy film was to be originally released around Christmas 2007, but instead was delayed again and again, which usually isn’t a good sign but might be explained by the trouble New Line Cinema was having at the time.

The story centers around 12 year old Meggie and her father Mo, who has the power to bring characters from books into the real world when he reads aloud. Turns out Mo discovered his power when his daughter was only a baby, and accidentally sent his wife into a book while reading Meggie a story. That, and an evil dude wants to use Mo’s power.

Based on the first book of a popular German trilogy of fantasy novels written by Cornelia Funke (The Thief Lord), who serves as a producer for the movie, Inkheart was adapted by David Lindsay-Abaire (Robots) and directed by Iain Softley (The Skeleton Key). It stars Brendan Fraser (the new Mummy movies), Eliza Bennett (The Contractor), Andy Serkis (The Cottage), Paul Bettany (The Da Vinci Code), Helen Mirren (National Treasure: Book Of Secrets), Jim Broadbent (Indiana Jones And The Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull) and Sienna Guillory (Eragon) among others.

I think the aforementioned first trailer was better made, but this still looks pretty good, I’m a sucker for (good) fantasy and I must say quite like some of the talent involved. What do you think? Does Inkheart have what it takes to join the closed circle of fantasy winners? The movie will premiere in Germany on December 11th, and will get releases in the rest of the world throughout early 2009.

Danny Elfman to score The Wolf Man, whole world utters loud “Duh!”

Superstar music master Danny Elfman (Hellboy II) has just been announced as the composer for Universal’s forthcoming remake of The Wolf Man. Elfman, who’s best known for his frequent collaborations with director Tim Burton as well as his theme for The Simpsons, is a good choice in my opinion, in addition to being a very obvious one (he did score Sleepy Hollow after all). I for one am looking forward to what musical wonders Mr Elfman will come up with.

The Wolf Man, a remake of the 1941 classic, will premiere on April 3rd in the US, UK and Denmark, with the rest of the world following shortly. Footage from the film was shown at this year’s Comic-Con, to very enthusiastic response. The premise of the film, which was written by Andrew Kevin Walker  (hey, Sleepy Hollow!) and David Self (Road To Perdition), goes like this, according to Wikipedia:

Set in the late 1880s, the film keeps the plotline of the original, with Lawrence Talbot meeting his father following the death of his brother. The film details events during Lawrence’s past that led to his estrangement from his father (which includes Gwen), and the setting is expanded from Blackmore (now identified as the village from the original) to London.[3] The official synopsis states Talbot was traumatized by his mother’s death as a child, while Gwen Conliffe is his brother’s fiancée. Following his brother’s disappearance, Talbot hunts a murderer, which turns out to be a werewolf, and the curse is passed on.

The film was originally to be directed by the über-talented Mark Romanek (One Hour Photo), but he left very early on due to budget disagreements, with the pretty competent Joe Johnston (Hidalgo) taking over as helmsman. Benicio Del Toro (Things We Lost In The Fire) plays the lead character and is joined Anthony Hopkins (Beowulf), Hugo Weaving (V For Vendetta) and Emily Blunt (Charlie Wilson’s War).

The Wolf Man will be Universal’s third attempt at resurrecting their old horror franchises, following the success of The Mummy and the failure of Van Helsing (a seriously underrated movie by the way). It seems as though The Wolf Man, which features makeup from maestro Rick Baker (Norbit), will be a decidedly more serious-minded affair than those movies, which turned away some moviegoers with their more light, fun approach to the source material.

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Movie Of The Day: King Solomon’s Mines (1985)

Just like Die Hard with Under Siege, Speed and countless other action movies, Indiana Jones inspired its own slew of adventure flicks from Michael Douglas’ Jack Colton movies to today’s Mummy and National Treasure franchises.

1985 saw the release of King Solomon’s Mines, an adaptation of H. Rider Haggard’s classic novel, directed by J. Lee Thompson (The Guns Of Navarone) and released by the now defunct Cannon Group. It stars Richard Chamberlain (Richard Lester’s Musketeers trilogy) as Allan Quatermain, horrible acting from Sharon Stone as the love interest, as well as Herbert Lom (the original Pink Panther films) and Indy’s own Sallah (John Rhys-Davies) as the villains. Review after the jump.

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