Movie Of The Day: Gold Diggers Of 1933 (1933)

Set during The Great Depression, Gold Diggers Of 1933 is the third adaptation of a Broadway musical by Avery Hopwood (The Bat). It was directed by Mervyn LeRoy (Mister Roberts) and written by Erwin S. Gelsey (Swing Time), James Seymour (42nd Street), David Boehm (Always) and Ben Markson (What Price Hollywood?). It stars Dick Powell (The Bad And The Beautiful), Joan Blondell (Grease), Warren William (The Wolf Man), Aline MacMahon (The Man From Laramie), Guy Kibbee (Mr. Smith Goes To Washington), Ruby Keeler (42nd Street), Ned Sparks (42nd Street) and Ginger Rogers (Top Hat).

Three out-of-work actresses are cast in a new show which will get going only once funding his provided. One of the girls’ boyfriend, a gifted musician decides to produce the show, but refuses to perform in it despite his obvious talent. When he’s forced to go on stage at the premiere following an unexpected, his identity is revealed and it turns out he’s part of powerful rich family. Concerned, his brother and the family lawyer arrive to stop him from marrying a gold digging showgirl but they mistake one of the other actresses as the girlfriend in question. The girls decide to play along and comedy ensues. Trailer and review after the jump. Continue reading

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Danny Elfman to score The Wolf Man, whole world utters loud “Duh!”

Superstar music master Danny Elfman (Hellboy II) has just been announced as the composer for Universal’s forthcoming remake of The Wolf Man. Elfman, who’s best known for his frequent collaborations with director Tim Burton as well as his theme for The Simpsons, is a good choice in my opinion, in addition to being a very obvious one (he did score Sleepy Hollow after all). I for one am looking forward to what musical wonders Mr Elfman will come up with.

The Wolf Man, a remake of the 1941 classic, will premiere on April 3rd in the US, UK and Denmark, with the rest of the world following shortly. Footage from the film was shown at this year’s Comic-Con, to very enthusiastic response. The premise of the film, which was written by Andrew Kevin Walker  (hey, Sleepy Hollow!) and David Self (Road To Perdition), goes like this, according to Wikipedia:

Set in the late 1880s, the film keeps the plotline of the original, with Lawrence Talbot meeting his father following the death of his brother. The film details events during Lawrence’s past that led to his estrangement from his father (which includes Gwen), and the setting is expanded from Blackmore (now identified as the village from the original) to London.[3] The official synopsis states Talbot was traumatized by his mother’s death as a child, while Gwen Conliffe is his brother’s fiancée. Following his brother’s disappearance, Talbot hunts a murderer, which turns out to be a werewolf, and the curse is passed on.

The film was originally to be directed by the über-talented Mark Romanek (One Hour Photo), but he left very early on due to budget disagreements, with the pretty competent Joe Johnston (Hidalgo) taking over as helmsman. Benicio Del Toro (Things We Lost In The Fire) plays the lead character and is joined Anthony Hopkins (Beowulf), Hugo Weaving (V For Vendetta) and Emily Blunt (Charlie Wilson’s War).

The Wolf Man will be Universal’s third attempt at resurrecting their old horror franchises, following the success of The Mummy and the failure of Van Helsing (a seriously underrated movie by the way). It seems as though The Wolf Man, which features makeup from maestro Rick Baker (Norbit), will be a decidedly more serious-minded affair than those movies, which turned away some moviegoers with their more light, fun approach to the source material.

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